Tribal protest over Indian mine

时间:2022-1-2 作者:仁爱英语网

BBC Learning English6 Minute English
Tribal protest over Indian mine
NB: This is not an accurate(精确的) word-for-word transcriptDima: Hi, welcome to this edition of 6 Minute English with me, Dima KostenkoKate: and me, Kate Colin. I am going to be your language guide over the next 6minutes, and we’re talking about a protest by an Indian tribe whose historicalland – the Niyamgiri Mountain range – is about to be used for industrial mining.
But before we look at the story, I thought it might be a good idea to go throughsome of today’s vocabulary(词语).
Dima: OK, shall we do it now?
Kate: Yeah, sure. First, the adjective ‘indigenous’. We use this word when we talkabout people or sometimes things that have always naturally lived in a place,rather than arriving from elsewhere. Secondly, the verb ‘to displace’, meaningto force people to leave the place where they normally live. And finally,another verb: ‘to worship’ – that’s to have deep faith in someone or something,to be fully devoted to them and to treat them as pine(神圣).
Dima: That’s ‘to worship’, ‘to displace’ and ‘indigenous’ Well, the latest protest by theindigenous tribal people in India, known as the Kondh, was given a fresh startlast week. It was then that demonstrators in London protested outside theheadquarters of Vedanta, a company that looks set to mine around 250 squarekilometres of the Kondh land for the bauxite.
Kate: Bauxite, that’s another name for the world’s main type of aluminium(铝) ore. Andaluminium of course is a light metal which is silver in colour and is used inmany different ways, especially for making cooking equipment and aircraftparts.
Dima: In a moment we’ll hear from Dr Bratindi Jenna, an activist who works with thecommunity. Dr Jenna says the 8,000 people who live in the mountainscompletely rely on their surroundings for everything: food, water, livelihoodand, importantly, faith. And here comes this week’s question for you Kate.
What or who do you think many indigenous people in the world often worship?
Is it their tribal chief (because of his position)? Is it church? Or is it nature?
Kate: AnswersDima: You’ll hear the answer in Dr Bratindi Jenna’s words – let’s listen and check ifyou got it right:
Clip 1 0’22"Indigenous people across the world worship(崇拜) nature. They worship something which hascontributed to their existence for generations. That’s their lifeline. It has river, it has food, ithas everything. Indigenous people are the owner of the land – and first of all we displace themand we give them some job which has no meaning for them.
Kate: Dr Jenna says indigenous people across the world worship nature. Whichmeans I was right/wrong with my earlier guess…Dima: And how does she explain this devotion to nature Kate?
Kate: Well she says that’s because nature has given them the land they live and feedon for many generations, from parents to children. Dr Jenna doesn’t believe indisplacing people because for them, she says, things can simply lose theirmeaning.
Dima: So that’s what last week’s protests in London were all about. Butunderstandably perhaps, the mining company sees the situation differently.
Let’s listen to Vedanta’s Chief Executive, M. S. Mehta. He says on the wholeIndia’s systems balance well the economic and social development.
Kate: This is a good word to know and use: ‘to balance’, meaning to give severalthings equal amounts of importance, time or money so that a situation issuccessful. And another expression I wanted to mention is ‘a final stamp ofapproval’, or ‘a final seal of approval’. This phrase is used when it has beenofficially decided that something should definitely happen.
Dima: That’s ‘to balance’ and ‘a final stamp of approval’. Listen out for these words -and also try to find out which very important Indian institution has given theirfinal stamp of approval to Vedanta’s project:
Clip 2 0’22"The issue has been in debate for last three years. And all the regulatory agencies in India havehad a look at it and the Supreme Court of India had got it re-verified and put the final stampof approval [in] August last year. India has a very good legal system, regulatory system bothbalancing development and the social development. I think we’ve got to start respecting thelegal system.
Dima: Did you hear the answer? Which important Indian institution has given its finalstamp of approval to the mining project?
…It was the Supreme Court of India. Still campaigners are not convinced. Theysay they want Vedanta to give up the mining project and to leave the area forgood. Until then, they say, they won’t stop their fight.
Kate: Quite a dramatic story – and you can find out more about it by following thelinks from our website, bbclearningenglish.com.
Dima: But before that, can I ask you to go through some of today’s key words andphrases again Kate?
Kate: Responds. We began with the adjective indigenous, meaning people that havealways naturally lived in a place, rather than arriving from elsewhere. Then wetalked about displacing, that’s when people are forced to leave the place wherethey normally live, and worshiping. ‘To worship’ means to have deep faith insomeone or something, to be fully devoted to them and to treat them as pine.
We mentioned bauxites – that’s another name for the world’s main type ofaluminium ore. And aluminium of course is a light metal which is silver incolour and is used in many different ways.
We had the verb to balance, meaning to give several things equal amounts ofimportance.
And just one more phrase to remember: a final stamp of approval. Thisphrase is used when it has been officially decided that something shoulddefinitely happen.
Dima: I’m afraid that’s all we have time for today. Until next week.
Both: Goodbye!
BBC Learning English6 Minute EnglishTribal protest over Indian mineNB: This is not an accurate word-for-word transcriptDima: Hi, welcome to this edition of 6 Minute English with me, Dima KostenkoKate: and me, Kate Colin. I am going to be your language guide over the next 6minutes, and we’re talking about a protest by an Indian tribe whose historicalland – the Niyamgiri Mountain range – is about to be used for industrial mining.
But before we look at the story, I thought it might be a good idea to go throughsome of today’s vocabulary.
Dima: OK, shall we do it now?
Kate: Yeah, sure. First, the adjective ‘indigenous’. We use this word when we talkabout people or sometimes things that have always naturally lived in a place,rather than arriving from elsewhere. Secondly, the verb ‘to displace’, meaningto force people to leave the place where they normally live. And finally,another verb: ‘to worship’ – that’s to have deep faith in someone or something,to be fully devoted to them and to treat them as pine.
Dima: That’s ‘to worship’, ‘to displace’ and ‘indigenous’ Well, the latest protest by theindigenous tribal people in India, known as the Kondh, was given a fresh startlast week. It was then that demonstrators in London protested outside theheadquarters of Vedanta, a company that looks set to mine around 250 squarekilometres of the Kondh land for the bauxite.
Kate: Bauxite, that’s another name for the world’s main type of aluminium ore. Andaluminium of course is a light metal which is silver in colour and is used inmany different ways, especially for making cooking equipment and aircraftparts.
Dima: In a moment we’ll hear from Dr Bratindi Jenna, an activist who works with thecommunity. Dr Jenna says the 8,000 people who live in the mountainscompletely rely on their surroundings for everything: food, water, livelihoodand, importantly, faith. And here comes this week’s question for you Kate.
What or who do you think many indigenous people in the world often worship?
Is it their tribal chief (because of his position)? Is it church? Or is it nature?
Kate: AnswersDima: You’ll hear the answer in Dr Bratindi Jenna’s words – let’s listen and check ifyou got it right:
Clip 1 0’22"Indigenous people across the world worship nature. They worship something which hascontributed to their existence for generations. That’s their lifeline. It has river, it has food, ithas everything. Indigenous people are the owner of the land – and first of all we displace themand we give them some job which has no meaning for them.
Kate: Dr Jenna says indigenous people across the world worship nature. Whichmeans I was right/wrong with my earlier guess…Dima: And how does she explain this devotion to nature Kate?
Kate: Well she says that’s because nature has given them the land they live and feedon for many generations, from parents to children. Dr Jenna doesn’t believe indisplacing people because for them, she says, things can simply lose theirmeaning.
Dima: So that’s what last week’s protests in London were all about. Butunderstandably perhaps, the mining company sees the situation differently.
Let’s listen to Vedanta’s Chief Executive, M. S. Mehta. He says on the wholeIndia’s systems balance well the economic and social development.
Kate: This is a good word to know and use: ‘to balance’, meaning to give severalthings equal amounts of importance, time or money so that a situation issuccessful. And another expression I wanted to mention is ‘a final stamp ofapproval’, or ‘a final seal of approval’. This phrase is used when it has beenofficially decided that something should definitely happen.
Dima: That’s ‘to balance’ and ‘a final stamp of approval’. Listen out for these words -and also try to find out which very important Indian institution has given theirfinal stamp of approval to Vedanta’s project:
Clip 2 0’22"The issue has been in debate for last three years. And all the regulatory agencies in India havehad a look at it and the Supreme Court of India had got it re-verified and put the final stampof approval [in] August last year. India has a very good legal system, regulatory system bothbalancing development and the social development. I think we’ve got to start respecting thelegal system.
Dima: Did you hear the answer? Which important Indian institution has given its finalstamp of approval to the mining project?
…It was the Supreme Court of India. Still campaigners are not convinced. Theysay they want Vedanta to give up the mining project and to leave the area forgood. Until then, they say, they won’t stop their fight.
Kate: Quite a dramatic story – and you can find out more about it by following thelinks from our website, bbclearningenglish.com.
Dima: But before that, can I ask you to go through some of today’s key words andphrases again Kate?
Kate: Responds. We began with the adjective indigenous(土著), meaning people that havealways naturally lived in a place, rather than arriving from elsewhere. Then wetalked about displacing, that’s when people are forced to leave the place wherethey normally live, and worshiping. ‘To worship’ means to have deep faith insomeone or something, to be fully devoted to them and to treat them as pine.
We mentioned bauxites – that’s another name for the world’s main type ofaluminium ore. And aluminium of course is a light metal which is silver incolour and is used in many different ways.
We had the verb to balance, meaning to give several things equal amounts ofimportance.
And just one more phrase to remember: a final stamp of approval. This phrase is used when it has been officially decided that something shoulddefinitely happen.
Dima: I’m afraid that’s all we have time for today. Until next week.
Both: Goodbye!(本文由在线英语听力室整理编辑)

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